les Davey de France

Alan and Pat live and work in Bordeaux. Alan is a pastor and Pat was a nurse. Now we work with UFM worldwide. Read on! (If you'd like to know what took us to Bordeaux, then start with the archives from September 2004)

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Mission week

A super team.
Good weather.
Pleasant folk.
Good food.
So far all good.


Wahay! Day off!

I usually take Monday as my day off and Pat and I embark on adventures and explorations around Bordeaux. This week Monday was busy, but we have a day off today and... we're off to a concert at the Opera House.

The awesome Marc Minkovsky has a production of La Vie Parisienne running just now - I haven't yet dared to look at the price of tickets - BUT yesterday on twitter I saw that the tenor lead is doing a lunchtime recital. These lunchtime concerts are a real bargain so they sell out quickly, but I tried for two seats and got them!

Yippeee!

Sunday, September 24, 2017

OM Team

Arrived.

Fine people from USA, France, England, Canada.


The hazards of running - update

Mrs Davey has a flare-up of her back problem.


Wednesday, September 20, 2017

The hazards of running

Falling over : Mrs Davey fell over this morning. She thinks there is only superficial injury, thankfully.

Episcopal visitation

We have had an episcopal visitation from Rhys and Jane Morgan over the past few days:


Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Back to running

It was good to be back pouring the paths again...

A little punctuated by my unsettled asthma, but it'll improve.


Thursday, September 14, 2017

New academic year, new printer cartridges

For some time I have been using "compatible" printer cartridges.

Everything I print in colour has been less and less well rendered over time, to the point where everything had an unpleasant blueish tinge.

It was time to splash out on some genuine Canon printer cartridges and see what that does.

And I am happy to say that the results are positive. We have yellows, reds and greens once more!

Now I need to stock up on paper.




Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Some pretty music from Praetorius

Let's hope I can just be ill and get it over with!

For a little while my asthma has been unsettled... Noisy breathing, especially at night...
In the meantime I've developed a chronically runny nose!
Then I THINK I have a little outbreak of shingles - little itchy spots here and there.
(When I had some before the doctor said it was that.)

I think I know what the problem is - too many evenings out doing this, that and the other.

I can't work morning, noon and night any more. I have to take a break now and again, and sadly at the rentrée it is sometimes not possible.

Usually when I have some little health niggle I do what British people do all over the world. I ignore it and hope it goes away. But yesterday I decided to mention it to a couple people.

"Ah, you need a break", said one person.

Well we might take a little breakette, perhaps, at the beginning of October, just after Mission Week.

Meanwhile, ha!

Last night Pat and I had an evening in alone. Yay!
We decided to have an early night. Yay!

Then at midnight she received a text message which woke us both up.

Pat slept fitfully after that.
I eventually got up, drank some camomile, ate an apple and went back to bed and to sleep at 4:30.

This morning the good news is that I have a headache! So I'm hoping I can break out in a good old cold and have done with it.

Meanwhile the morning, noon and night thing should come to an end soon, and I'm boosting my vitamin intake in the meantime!

Monday, September 11, 2017

Preaching the incarnation

It's not easy, is it, and the beginner preacher can get into some rather sticky situations.
Here's some thoughts:

1) It isn't easy and I don't think our task is necessarily to make it look easy to talk about the incarnation. The degree of unease and discomfort that people see can reinforce what we're talking about; people can see and hear that we are somewhat outranked by the truth that we're struggling to convey.

2) Be familiar with the classic systematic formulations. For example, the definition of Chalcedon really helps if you will think about it and master it, or rather allow what it expresses to master you:

We, then, following the holy Fathers, all with one consent, teach people to confess one and the same Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, the same perfect in Godhead and also perfect in manhood; truly God and truly man, of a reasonable soul and body; consubstantial with the Father according to the Godhead, and consubstantial with us according to the Manhood; in all things like unto us, without sin; begotten before all ages of the Father according to the Godhead, and in these latter days, for us and for our salvation, born of the Virgin Mary, the Mother of God, according to the Manhood; one and the same Christ, Son, Lord, only begotten, to be acknowledged in two natures, inconfusedly, unchangeably, indivisibly, inseparably; the distinction of natures being by no means taken away by the union, but rather the property of each nature being preserved, and concurring in one Person and one Subsistence , not parted or divided into two persons, but one and the same Son, and only begotten God , the Word, the Lord Jesus Christ; as the prophets from the beginning have declared concerning Him, and the Lord Jesus Christ Himself has taught us, and the Creed of the holy Fathers has handed down to us.

The vocabulary is a little challenging, but the basis of what they are saying is pretty clear:

One person, one soul, one body, just like us. But with two natures.

He is a real 100% human being, a man just like us but without sin.

He is also God, really 100% God, still being all that God is.

But there is just one "he", and it isn't like playing roles or transforming from one to the other and back.

There are no analogies because nothing else is like this.
Just like for the Trinity, there are no analogies because nothing else is like this.

We can find illustrations. For example I am Welsh and I live in Bordeaux. When I speak French you can tell there's something different about me, but you may not know what it is. From time to time, though, you can really tell that I am Welsh. But I'm always Welsh, whether you can see it or not, and my Welshness is not something I turn on and off. Usually. Anyway, as I said, there are no analogies, but sometimes we can find illustrations that may perhaps help a little.

3) Think about what he left behind when he became man. What did he leave behind, really?

4) Think about what he took on when he became man. What did he add in his humanity?

5) Think about words that we use. Some words can provoke a strong reaction. Don't necessarily avoid them, but be ready to explain what you mean and why you use that word.

for example, weak. It is clear that Jesus took on human weakness. What is weaker than a new-born infant? What is weaker than a thirsty man sat by a well with nothing with which to draw water? But ordinary, human, physical weakness does not necessarily imply moral weakness, weakness of character or weakness of judgement.

6) Remember that making a slip doesn't make you a false teacher. We learn from our slips and errors and struggle to try to find the right words to explain the inexpressible. False teachers deliberately try to gain a following for their novelties. It's different.

7) Don't get hamstrung by your own inability to fully understand. Luke records Paul saying "(ESV) care for the church of God, which he obtained with his own blood" while warning against false teachers. I know that among the elders listening to Paul there were probably none of the heresy-hunters that might take you on, so perhaps you do need to exercise care, but it would be a crying shame to fall short of preaching the wonder of the voluntary self-humiliation of the glorious Son of God because you are scared of accidentally tripping up.

Sunday, September 10, 2017

The Prosperity Gospel

I had a colleague years ago who attended a church where you could be healed of your money worries. Needless to say, the queues for this were long, and never seemed to diminish.

I've read stuff about the prosperity gospel and encountered the edges of it in the pressure put on folks from some backgrounds to succeed in their studies and so prove their faithfulness to God. In fact, years ago in a Christian bookshop in Wales I overheard a conversation where a student's first class honours degree was hailed with "What a testimony!". Well maybe, or maybe not...

Anyway it's been a very different experience to talk recently with someone coming from a prosperity gospel background and to discover what a full-on culture of that produces in your life.

The person concerned summed it up under four headings :

What did Jesus die to secure for us? Did Jesus go to the cross to buy us wealth, health and worldly success, or to secure our holiness and fellowship with God?

Salvation by works. Is salvation a free, unmerited gift of God, hard-won for us by the Lord Jesus Christ, or is it something we must fight to obtain, conquering our own sin and failings in order to earn a salvation that we can never be sure of having fully achieved.

Faith and devotion spoiled. Is faith the happy, confident trust of a child of God in his wise and living heavenly Father, or is it a tool that we use to obtain from him the things we really want, like a good job, a nice house, a smart car and a desirable marriage partner.

Corrupted service. Is my Christian service my chance to prove myself by having a wonderful and successful ministry, or is it my opportunity to be involved in my small way in the wonderful things my Heavenly Father is accomplishing?

I want to emphasise that this is not my caricature, but my summary of the unprompted testimony of someone caught up in the prosperity gospel movement and who saw through it.


Bordeaux Church Sermon Podcast

From time to time people say that our church's sermons should be online.

I have a couple of issues with this:

1) I see myself as a housewife rather than a TV chef, someone who is called to feed a family rather than to run a classy restaurant. This means that I aim to preach domestically rather than globally.

2) The Interweb is stuffed with sermon podcasts from every kind of style and stream of Christianity imaginable, and several more that defy the imagination. You need a very good reason to add to this.

But when people ask you to it makes you think. And then came Anchor, an application for iPhone which makes it easy to make a podcast and even to publish it via Apple and Google.

I have a good recorder. Or rather Gwilym does, but it's here in France and he's in England.

So we launched it. The Bordeaux Church Sermon Podcast.

We do have a bijou problemette... we cannot accurately predict when people will be unable to follow adequately in English, so that means that sometimes our messages are ... inflated in length ... by the résumés we give in French. As of yet I don't know how to tackle this.

Friday, September 08, 2017

Finding accommodation in Bordeaux

Lots of people are finding it hard.

Here are some links that may help: http://www.bordeauxchurch.info/p/coming-to-bordeaux.html

A Helter-Skelter Couple Days

It's the rentrée scolaire this week, back to school week. And every year it's nuts.

I don't know why. We haven't had kids in school now for three years, but still back to school week is nuts.

Still, today I have a chance to catch up with myself and with things, just a little.


Thursday, September 07, 2017

They didn't ask. I didn't tell them.

So I joined this choir, right? I did tell you?

Partly to meet folk, partly for therapy. I like music. I like singing. It's good for me, though less good for my family...

Anyway I joined the choir, I think, in February. They were in the throes of preparing two choral pieces for a concert in October. The pieces are the Mass by Peteris Vasks, a living Baltic composer who's the son of a Baptist pastor, and Bach's cantata no. 4, Christ lag in Todesbanden.

I have had a ball. The Vasks is dense, swirly, a bit complex harmonically and rhythmically, you have to read and keep your wits about you. The Bach I have sung before, in 1978, when I was a student, in the Aberystwyth Bach Society Choir. It's great fun. Easier harmonically but still you need to read is well and keep alert. Non-trivial.

The conductor is great. He's cheerful, happy, appreciative, musical, disciplined without being too severe and generally extremely likeable.

And the choir has been glad to have me. I'm probably the youngest baritone by several years, and men are scarce in choirs in France. Not only that but I can read music, sing more or less in tune and understand and obey a conductor's instructions.

Then I saw the date of the concert. Sunday 1st October.

It's a Sunday. And it is the last Sunday of our mission week.

Oh well, maybe after the service I'll be able to scuttle up to Mérignac where the concert is taking place and it'll all work out OK. I had to do that once in Aber, though I did feel a ninny attending church in black bowtie and jacket.

Then I saw the time of the concert. It starts at 5pm.

5pm is the time of our service.

We had rehearsal last night - working on "Es war ein wunderlicher Krieg".

They didn't ask. I didn't tell them.

Wednesday, September 06, 2017

Horace

One of our old meet-up places, Les Mots Bleus, is under new management and has a new name.

Horace.

Yes, I know. I spotted it one day back in the summer and yesterday walked past to see what gives.

It's open. It's being run by the guys from the best coffee shop in Bordeaux and they have kept on some of the staff from Les Mots Bleus.

This morning Pat and I had arranged to meet some workers from the USA for a coffee, so we met them at Horace. It was great!


A free concert on the steps of the Grand Theatre


Monday, September 04, 2017

C'est la fin ... des saucisses

The meeting room of the brethren assembly has been closed for refurbishment since the end of June. They've had an architect in who has done some major remodelling, indulging adding a new vestibule, a staircase and an upper room for children's activities.

Scheduled to take the month of July, the works have expended to fill July and August, but next Sunday we are dur to be back in the premises once more.

Meanwhile we have met in our flat or in James' flat. The drawback is that there is obviously less room and, to avoid annoyance, we have not belted out our usual rowdy songs. However there have been fewer people present these summer months and we have been able to eat together after the service.

So last night was the night of the end of the sausages. Merguez, to be exact. A spicy mix of lamb and beef, I think they are the morrocan answer to the ubiquitous pork chipolata. Still the amount of fat that comes out of them is alarming and the indigestion in the wee hours makes the end of the sausages sound like not such a bad thing.

Last night we were 24 or 25 people. Five people crushed onto our sofa. No-one was left standing or sat on the floor, but every conceivable chair was occupied.

This morning began by degreasing everything in sight, then rearranging the furniture to its usual position. It will be good to be back in our old meeting room!